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<Ned> Front Porch

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Better World Media with Chris Binkowski

Posted to: <Ned> Front Porch by Chris Binkowski (16), Mon, 18 Feb 2008 08:47:55 PST
Feedback score: 0 +|-
Tags:  filtration innovation video water
Comments:
77 by 11 members
Viewed: 972 times by 41 members

Comments « prev page    1  2 [3] 4    next page »page 3



By Perry Gruber (16), Fri, 04 Apr 2008 14:20:07 PST
Comment feedback score: 1 (*) +|-

Mark Grimes said:

Back to water for a moment. Amazing new water cleaning product I read about months ago...

First Vid of Dean Kamen's Miracle Water Distiller

I saw this distiller demonstrated on The Colbert Report too. It was very timely because I had heard several reports on NPR about the growing issue of water...some say it's going to dwarf the oil shortage...but Kamen's distiller offers some hope. Actually I heard a news report that despite the apparent water shortages in the world, there actually is more water underground that there is oil and natural gas, but this water is brackish. Many times oil rigs are spending thousands of ergs to put water back into the ground that they inadvertently uncover in their search for oil. Kamen’s device may enable us to tap into this vast wealth of a natural resource that is far and above oil as an essential resource for human survival. Yay to Kamen! Here’s a link to the NPR article on water called “Fresh Water out of Reach for Many Worldwide.”

http://www.npr.org/templates/sto ry/story.php?storyId=88748664


By Chris Binkowski (16), Wed, 09 Apr 2008 07:26:13 PDT
Comment feedback score: 2 (* *) +|-

Hi! I'm a little late this week because I was away. Hope everyone is well.

On one hand I think this is cool. On the hand, I find it a bit insulting that we in the west are creating such labour intensive solutions that we'd never use ourselves.

Potenco's Pull-Cord Power Generator

"Wired visits Potenco, makers of a pull-cord power generator the company says could bring power to hundreds of millions. We put it through the paces with one of the company's founders at their headquarters inside the Alameda Naval Base near Oakland, California."

Elephant Painting

"Can your elephant paint? Watch this elephant, rescued from abusive treatment in Burma, now paint an amazing self portrait. You'll be amazed at how his talent unfolds.

So touched by their horrific backgrounds and loving personalities, ExoticWorldGifts.com now supports, "Starving Elephant Artisans" by selling their paintings so they can continue to have a new life in Thailand."

Cheers!


By Linda Nowakowski (230), Wed, 09 Apr 2008 07:54:06 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

The first video tells me it is no longer available when I try to play it....? The second one got about half done and then went bonkers and told me it was no longer available.

Realize it could be a YouTube/Thailand issue...they aren't good friends ;-)


By Mark Grimes (222), Wed, 09 Apr 2008 08:07:34 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

Looks to be a Thai/YouTube argument...worked fine just now.

Chris, the Potenco Pull Cord Power Generator is cool...but like the reporter says, only if the price is right. It costs 500 shillings (.33 cents) to charge a cell phone in Uganda. Not sure how much kerosene/candles cost. But if the power generator can provide a cost/time savings, that could be very, very cool. Great find!


By Perry Gruber (16), Wed, 09 Apr 2008 15:41:40 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

Hmm, I get that the Potenco guy says they're getting a strong positive response from this product. Yet, I agree with you Chris about technology for poor people that we'd never use...

As I was mentioning on the thread about a project in China we're struggling with, I think any solution entails multiple dimensions to be a sustainable and practical solution for poor people. The Grameen family of companies is a great example where they have considered the full dimensions of being a human being in poverty situations and have successfully developed fully sustainable, growing and interelated business models that speak to every dimension and also operate as thriving businesses.

So, for example, for its electricity needs, could a community build a fiancial framework of partnerships that would allow it to finance a solar energy/battery storage system that could power basic lighting and other electricity needs for the entire community? Such a framework could be owned as a public utility by the community and financed through Grameen finance models. Businesses using the electricity would repay the original loans/investments and as community businesses prosper, they pay back the original loans used to build the system in the first place. Of course, this is contingent on solar and battery technology being affordable. But it doesn't necessarily need to be if a northern company, consortium of companies, or individuals (through Kiva perhaps) were willing to subsidize a portion of the capital costs as a social venture....Creative lending institutions or individuals could own a stake in the utility as social investors who would be repaid over time for their investment at reasonable (poverty level) interest rates or at 0% interest. The whole structure would be a social business - built purposefully to provide electricity to the poor, not to generate huge profits...so the only requirement of the utility would be to sustainably generate electricity for the poor....I don't know. Just thinking out loud here...


By Chris Binkowski (16), Sun, 13 Apr 2008 08:38:01 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

Hi Perry,

I don't have any experience or expertise to really comment on the problems you mention. I think it is important, like you say, to implement solutions on multilevels. One of the key factors for this to happen is for everyone in the community to be working to make the community better.

I'm assuming that often businesses and other groups like certain classes or perhaps a certain ethnic group become more commited to their own goals to the detriment of the entire community.

It's good to hear that Grameen is working hard to address the whole picture. I always prefer a doctor who looks at the whole patient over one who focuses just on specific problems with considering the rest of the body.


By Chris Binkowski (16), Sun, 13 Apr 2008 17:17:31 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

Better late than never! I finally found a moment to watch Sungha Jung play Come Together. Needless to say the next half hour melted away as I kept watching more videos by this young prodigy. WOW! The tones are beautiful and watching his hands is mesmerizing.

Thank you John.

John Powers said:

Chris thank you so much for doing this thread.

Now for my off-topic rant:-)

A friend sent me a link to a video of a young guitar prodigy on YouTube named Sungha Jung. Sungha is unbelievably talented. He started playing when he was 9 and now is 12. Over seventy videos have been uploaded so you can see him growing up before your eyes. It's hard to pick one video that demonstrates his virtuosity, but Come Together captures some of it.

One reason for mentioning Sungha Jung, other than just the tip that his playing is worth experiencing, is an example of the kind of connectedness that Mark showed with Shawn in Bangladesh and Ray, Jackie, and Meron in Lesotho. It is a big world, but as big as it is we are connected in so many ways.

Something that I marvel about Sungha Jung is the commitment to being a guitar player and the wisdom to recognize greatness in others. I'm sure that Sungha has help in this from his parents, but you cannot take anything away from him about his understanding other guitar players for what is great in their performances. So a young boy from South Korea is being influenced by guitarist from all over the world, and not necessarily the most famous ones.


By Chris Binkowski (16), Sun, 13 Apr 2008 18:04:05 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

Better late than never part 2.

I finally took some time to watch Shawn's Uncultured Project videos that he shared on page 2 of the thread. Of course, was very inspired by them. Also noticed that he's received some promotion from one of top 100 channels on YouTube: vlogbrothers.

Here's the video and description text:

Nerdfighting in Bangladesh

The place to donate: http://tinyurl.com/43ak4n

In which John discusses WorldSuck in Bangladesh, and the idea of us v. them.

We'll see the results at Shawn's youtube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/Uncu lture... And on his web site: http://www.uncultured.com

Visit other nerdfighters at the ning: http://www.nerdfighters.com


By Chris Binkowski (16), Mon, 14 Apr 2008 14:59:24 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

Monday afternoon and time for some videos!

I have to confess I still haven't watched Randy Pausch's lecture.. some day soon I'll make the time for it.

Here's a public service announcement of The Lustgarten Foundation for Pancreatic Cancer Research featuring Dr. Randy Pausch.

Randy Pausch: Life. Lessons. Legacy.

BIG IDEAS FOR A SMALL PLANET: Power (2)

http://www.sundancechannel....

Students at Solar Decathlon are given seven days to reconstruct their solar homes.

Free Zhiwen Wang! -- 10,000 Signature Drive

"We need your help to free my dad, Zhiwen Wang! Please visit http://freemydad.org and sign the petition. 10,000 signatures by Father's Day!"


By John Powers (139), Mon, 14 Apr 2008 16:26:26 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

In today's Pittsburgh Post Gazette is and article with an interview with Randy Pausch A cancer leaves few to lobby.

The paper also has a short video of highlights from his The Last Lecture


By Lex (2), Tue, 15 Apr 2008 11:50:51 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

Chris Binkowski said:

Innovate or Die - AquaDuct: Mobile Filtration Vehicle

The Aquaduct is pedal powered vehicle that transports, filters, and stores water for the developing world. A peristaltic pump attached to the pedal crank draws water from a large tank, through a filter, to a smaller clean tank. The clean tank is removable and closed for contamination-free home storage and use. A clutch engages and disengages the drive belt from the pedal crank, enabling the rider to filter the water while traveling or while stationary.

The Aquaduct is the winning entry in the Innovate or Die contest put on by Google and Specialized. The contest challenge was to build a pedal powered machine that has environmental impact. Please see the website (www.innovate-or-die.com) for more details.

--

I wonder how difficult it is to actually introduce these bikes into the communities that need them..

Chris, A wonderful innovation! Now we need a process to make and distibute these, perhaps with a donation site to support the effort. I would think that if people saw a real, positive way to impact some of the big problems in the world, they would be happy to contribute. I for one am tired of feeling helpless to help against these seemingly insurmountably large problems. Lex


By Mark Grimes (222), Tue, 15 Apr 2008 11:54:55 PDT
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Hey Lex, here's a very real project by very trusted Ned members where just a little bit of money can go a long, long way. It will help create a sustainable brick making business in Swaziland

And, we'll see photos of the entire process as it unfolds.

(I'm in for $75, and hope others join in as well)


By Mark Grimes (222), Thu, 17 Apr 2008 08:02:19 PDT
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This is just pure feel-good, but how fun.

I Love the World


By Chris Binkowski (16), Thu, 17 Apr 2008 08:36:12 PDT
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Boom-de-yada! This is awesome, Mark. :) Thanks!

Mark Grimes said:

This is just pure feel-good, but how fun.

I Love the World


By Chris Binkowski (16), Mon, 21 Apr 2008 13:40:19 PDT
Comment feedback score: 1 (*) +|-

Hello. Hope Spring is blooming or Fall is cresting wherever you are. Two more videos for you to watch. I'll let them speak for themselves.

It Could Be You

The two sites: http://www.darfurisdying.com/ http://www.playagainstallodds.co m/

Train Runs Through Bangkok Market

Peace.


By Mark Grimes (222), Mon, 21 Apr 2008 14:29:33 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

I totally understand the feeling of the young woman in the It Could Be You video. I've had some similar feelings, though try to have "mindfulness" be in the place of "guilt". Every day I feel fortunate to live the life I have, yet try to remain mindful that billions of people do not have the same "luxury". On one hand I don't want to feel bad/guilty if I want to enjoy a rare nice $100 dinner out with my wife. On the other hand, I try to do something to make the world a little bit better place each and every day.

The second vide...well, I didn't see the end coming and wow. Another great find. Thnx Chris.


By Gayle Rogers (78), Tue, 22 Apr 2008 20:06:48 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

Hey Chris,

The Thai market video made me smile. I've seen similar things throughout Asia - not necessarily with trains (!!!!) but certainly roads, bridges and open public areas that literally morph into a market or place of trading at very specific times of the day........and then magically disappear without a trace until the next day.

Some of the hawker stands in Saigon are amazing. Between 5am and 7am, breakfast making pans and pots, seating and little tables just appear on the street - proper little "street restaurants" all unpacked from the backs of motorbikes.

And then you look out the window at 7:05am and they are gone - back to a clear sidewalk and pedestrians zipping around for the start of the working day. The efficiency of the use of available space - in order to make a living - amazes me. Gold-standard resourcefulness.....and a great brekkie on the street to boot. Love it.

(When I bitch at some point in the future, can someone please remind me that I have just implied that I love Pho - vietnamese beef broth - for breakfast? Thanks - coz from day 30 onward of eating Pho, I usually have a different opinion!! :)


By Linda Nowakowski (230), Wed, 23 Apr 2008 02:11:04 PDT
Edited: Wed, 23 Apr 2008 02:17:39 PDT
Comment feedback score: 1 (*) +|-

This is not Bangkok but it is a train that starts at Bangkok and ends in Mae Khlong in Samut Songkhram, Thailand. This video is a bit better view of it.

Train Runs Through MaeKhlong Market

:-D

Edit to make the video work


By Chris Binkowski (16), Fri, 25 Apr 2008 07:51:29 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

Hi Gayle,

Thanks for the beautiful imagery. Sometimes I wish I lived in a community that had such vibrancy especially when it comes to food. There's such an amazing interconnectedness from the train market to the motorcycle cafes.

Enjoy the Pho! :) Chris

Gayle Rogers said:

Hey Chris,

The Thai market video made me smile. I've seen similar things throughout Asia - not necessarily with trains (!!!!) but certainly roads, bridges and open public areas that literally morph into a market or place of trading at very specific times of the day........and then magically disappear without a trace until the next day.

Some of the hawker stands in Saigon are amazing. Between 5am and 7am, breakfast making pans and pots, seating and little tables just appear on the street - proper little "street restaurants" all unpacked from the backs of motorbikes.

And then you look out the window at 7:05am and they are gone - back to a clear sidewalk and pedestrians zipping around for the start of the working day. The efficiency of the use of available space - in order to make a living - amazes me. Gold-standard resourcefulness.....and a great brekkie on the street to boot. Love it.

(When I bitch at some point in the future, can someone please remind me that I have just implied that I love Pho - vietnamese beef broth - for breakfast? Thanks - coz from day 30 onward of eating Pho, I usually have a different opinion!! :)


By Chris Binkowski (16), Mon, 28 Apr 2008 12:27:03 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

Hello! The video today will challenge your reflexes as you'll probably have to pause it several times to read the text. Might even require a few rewinds. It's worth the effort though.

Twitter and the World Simulation

demonstrates the use of Twitter and Jott in the World Simulation, a radical experiment in education coordinated by Michael Wesch, Kansas State University

More info: http://mediatedcultures.net/worl dsim.htm

Download HQ version (wmv): http://www.mediafire.com/?04kjen 4mmnm


By Chris Binkowski (16), Mon, 12 May 2008 16:46:45 PDT
Edited: Mon, 12 May 2008 16:49:05 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

Good evening. Hope everyone is well. I must admit this one isn't a rare find, since it's featured at the moment on the front page of YouTube, but I'm still in awe. Makes me wonder what health care is like in Japan if people are willing to tolerate conditions like this. The strong and the willing will adapt or at least survive.


By Chris Binkowski (16), Sun, 18 May 2008 08:04:21 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

The Meaning


By Gayle Rogers (78), Sun, 18 May 2008 16:23:13 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

As always, thanks Chris!! (I logged in to answer a couple of PMs and - despite my time-poor status right now - couldn't resist taking a quick look!!)

I'm not sure if I'm delighted or deflated by the responses in this video.

If I think about the likely responses from people living in other parts of the world (other than US, UK etc. ) it makes this video look like a snap-shot of the psychological effects of Liberal Democracy (and individualism) a generation on.

Mmmmmm!

Later Alligator :)


By Chris Binkowski (16), Sun, 18 May 2008 18:40:42 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

Touche, Gayle!

I was, much like you, both touched by the video and having a sense of disappointment. Even the title and text in the video give it a false sense of grandeur or meaning.

Thanks for checking it out and sharing your thoughts.

Gayle Rogers said:

As always, thanks Chris!! (I logged in to answer a couple of PMs and - despite my time-poor status right now - couldn't resist taking a quick look!!)

I'm not sure if I'm delighted or deflated by the responses in this video.

If I think about the likely responses from people living in other parts of the world (other than US, UK etc. ) it makes this video look like a snap-shot of the psychological effects of Liberal Democracy (and individualism) a generation on.

Mmmmmm!

Later Alligator :)


By Chris Binkowski (16), Mon, 19 May 2008 18:54:10 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

Here's another video by Tom. I like it because, for me, it was easy to take all the questions he's asking in it on a national level and apply them to a global level or even on a local level. How can we work together?

Sushi Politics

Have a good two weeks!


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