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The Worldwide Connection Project

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'BIG' idea

Posted to: The Worldwide Connection Project by Nicholas Bentley (27), Wed, 19 Aug 2009 08:38:23 PDT
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Comments: 26 by 6 members
Viewed: 189 times by 15 members

Basic Income Grants are an interesting idea and I wondered if when a rich WWC area was partnered with a really poor community BIG's could be an effective way to make a difference.

The idea that is being tested in this small Namibian village is simple: All the residents are paid a basic monthly income of 100 Namibia dollars, or about €9 ($13). There are no conditions, and nothing is expected in return. Giving these citizens enough money to feed themselves and send children to school empowers them with a sense of responsibility and many businesses and projects are springing up as a result of this initial stimulus.

What do you think?



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By David Bale (146), Wed, 19 Aug 2009 12:55:46 PDT
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Thanks for sharing this, Nicholas.

It certainly is a very interesting idea - particularly in waiting to see the outcome of the pilot. It's especially interesting to find that the pilot is not getting governmental funding, but it being funded from a pot to which a coalition of German organisations are contributing.

The difficulty in simply implementing this within a WWC framework is the sheer size of the pot required to pay half a million people a Basic Income Grant. I calculate that it would require $78 million per year. That might be a feasible investment for a nation or international coalition of nations, particularly when the BIG can be recouped to some extent through the taxation of the better off.

When it is scaled down, though, to a community of say 500, the numbers seem a bit more manageable, but it would still require $78,000 a year. This might be within the compass of a prosperous church congregation, for example.

Much will depend therefore on seeing how the pilot in Otjivero village works out. The sceptics obviously think the grants will be frittered away. The believers emphasise that the money is at least reaching the people intended to receive it (unlike much existing aid) and hope the grants will be invested in education and life-changing enterprises. It's an intriguing prospect.


By Ben Parkinson (72), Wed, 19 Aug 2009 13:51:59 PDT
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Strange that I posted a similar suggestion today at http://www.ned.com/group/communi ty-general/news/338/ regarding open grants.

Yes, I agree it is an interesting idea and needs some careful analysis.

I would like to see it linked to an improved shop with items available which would improve standards of living. Giving added money to the lower paid in Britain has created many drug addicts and alcoholics (as well as the positive benefits), but it's a very different scenario.

There are many better ways to spend $78k, though imho.


By Nicholas Bentley (27), Thu, 20 Aug 2009 07:24:24 PDT
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David~Please Support Sherry's CameraWish~Bale said:

The difficulty in simply implementing this within a WWC framework is the sheer size of the pot required to pay half a million people a Basic Income Grant. I calculate that it would require $78 million per year. That might be a feasible investment for a nation or international coalition of nations, particularly when the BIG can be recouped to some extent through the taxation of the better off.

I agree, when you look at the numbers on a large scale they look daunting and probably only feasible at a national aid funding level. The number that caught my attention was the 9€ a month per person. If there were an equal number of contributors in a rich community could it work in some cases, at some scale?

And Ben Parkinson said:

There are many better ways to spend $78k, though imho.

I think the counter argument here, if the project works on a larger scale, is that billions have been contributed in other aid programs and the overall situation has not improved. The beneficiaries are not becoming self sufficient which is the only long term solution.


By David Bale (146), Thu, 20 Aug 2009 14:52:35 PDT
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Nicholas said:

The number that caught my attention was the 9€ a month per person. If there were an equal number of contributors in a rich community could it work in some cases, at some scale?

Ben said:

There are many better ways to spend $78k, though imho.

I think I agree with you both.

A couple of years down the road, for example, might a group of contributors be interested in paying a BIG to a Butterfly-selected group if they were able to express their aspirations as a group and give some idea of the ways they might decide to use the money?

Of course, this may run counter to the idea of unconditional payments and allowing the recipients to spend their BIGs any way they wish. But unless there is sufficient determination and enough money in the funding pot, not everyone will receive a Basic Income Grant. And in those circumstances, how might you decide better who should receive a BIG than by seeking information about how the money is likely to be spent.

It need not follow that the contributors should expect to control exactly how the money is spent. That would be to undermine totally the whole rationale for making Basic Income Grants: that it will enable people to take greater responsibility for determining their own futures. That same rationale might, however, be compatible with the notion that BIGs will need to be renewed - and, at the point of renewal, it would be surprising if those contributing to the grants did not exercise their right to review how their contributions were being used, before confirming their willingness to continue their financial support.

So, if there is to be any choice about who receives a Basic Income Grant, wouldn't it make sense to steer them towards the people who could best use them for the financial and social improvement of the whole community.


By Nicholas Bentley (27), Sun, 23 Aug 2009 02:57:21 PDT
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I totally agree that directing aid to a Butterfly group where they had stated goals and support would be a excellent use of funds.

I still think in some situations the BIG-no-strings-attached idea has merit. I imagine a family where the man might just use his grant for drink or drugs but the woman would be more likely to buy food and even start a small business as described in the article. If the grant was selective and just gave it to the woman say, as the one more likely to use the money for the good of the household, there is the risk that the man would just come along and demand his share (or all of it) and intermediately the benefit is diluted.


By David Bale (146), Sun, 23 Aug 2009 13:08:34 PDT
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I think you're right, Nicholas, in pointing to the way that a no-strings-attached approach can enpower individuals to make the best possible use of their BIGs.

But I wonder if it might be helpful to distinguish between qualifying for a BIG with no strings attached and receiving a BIG with no strings attached?

The latter seems to me to encapsulate the spirit in which basic income grants have been put forward as an idea. As for the former, if I understand this rightly, BIGs were conceived as payments for which there would be universal qualification. Hence no strings can be attached without it conflicting with the idea of universal entitlement. At the same time, if - as seems likely - shortage of funds will of necessity mean choices being made about entitlement, the selection of BIG recipients might best be made with reference to whatever strings may need to be attached - if only because this might lead to more effective targetting of limited resources on those individuals about whom the greatest hopes are realistically entertained.

If there is a valuable principle here involving the empowerment of BIG recipients by not attaching strings to how they spend any money they receive, there is an equally valuable principle in not ruling out the expression of aspirations as a selection tool when deciding who should receive a BIG in circumstances where selection choices need to be made.


By Ben Parkinson (72), Mon, 24 Aug 2009 01:12:58 PDT
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Also at the other end of the scale, whilst not too appropriate in "villages" is "means-testing". Would the chief of the village qualify for his grant too?


By Lauben Tushemereirwe (15), Mon, 24 Aug 2009 05:30:38 PDT
Comment feedback score: 1 (*) +|-

Iam happy to have a say on this platform. My experience working with local communities / villages is that people sustain interventions where they are directly involved right from identification of the problem, planning and designing action oriented strategies,impementation and evaluation of the interventions put in place to overcome the identified problem. In such a case therefore, aid to such a community should go directly to solving an immediate problem the community has identified by use of participatory tools. For this to be very effective, there is need for advocacy campaigns to key duty bearers for example the village chiefs not own the interventions as their own but to provide the techinical leadership in order to make the interventions sustainable. The community needs capacity building programmes in a rights based approach to sustainable development so they are able to demand for their rights and own the interventions. I believe a well informed community that has identified and priotised an intervention to solve an immediate problem should be given aid that has no strings attached.


By Lauben Tushemereirwe (15), Tue, 25 Aug 2009 02:35:44 PDT
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Alright, the WWC project is a very good initiative with a focused vision. It is indeed true that when the world is shared, then it will be closer and people will get to know the best practices, lessons learnt, challenges as well as new ways of carrying on development work bridging the widening gap between the developed and developing countries. Iam speaking from a rural perspective and i herewith attach a photograph of some of the children living in difficult conditions after loosing their parents to the Monster AIDS. There are very many other children in Rakai and Lyantonde districts of Uganda living on their own in very difficult conditons without parental love, care and guidance. I trust the wwc project has already provided a platform for us to share such information. Thank you all for making this possible.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2451/3854881435_c64d0a5848.jpg

By Ben Parkinson (72), Tue, 25 Aug 2009 04:16:21 PDT
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Lauben Tushemereirwe said:

Iam happy to have a say on this platform. My experience working with local communities / villages is that people sustain interventions where they are directly involved right from identification of the problem, planning and designing action oriented strategies,impementation and evaluation of the interventions put in place to overcome the identified problem. In such a case therefore, aid to such a community should go directly to solving an immediate problem the community has identified by use of participatory tools. For this to be very effective, there is need for advocacy campaigns to key duty bearers for example the village chiefs not own the interventions as their own but to provide the techinical leadership in order to make the interventions sustainable. The community needs capacity building programmes in a rights based approach to sustainable development so they are able to demand for their rights and own the interventions. I believe a well informed community that has identified and priotised an intervention to solve an immediate problem should be given aid that has no strings attached.

I agree with this and a few words with some of the bright sparks in Kinuuka village (?) showed that they were already thinking about some of the life-enhancing developments for their homes and surroundings. Travel is very problematic, though in Uganda and is stifling these ideas.

In Nigeria, though, I found that innovative thinking in the villages was by no means universal. Some were poorly kept and disorganised, while others were incredibly creative and brimming with more ideas than they could service.

Clearly it will be identical in Uganda. Some villages would make use of such a BIG, others would squander it. Those that squander now, though, copy effectively later, once they are shown how.


By Lauben Tushemereirwe (15), Tue, 25 Aug 2009 13:31:12 PDT
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Thanks Ben for your contribution. It is good you have been here and you have witnessed all this happen up to the extent of retrieving place names in their correct spellings. I herewith bring on board one of the families improvising for shelter.Due to congestion in the house, the family has improvised. During the day, the mattress that was offered by a charity organisation is hanged up and during the night it is put down for children to sleep on. This is because there are no movements in the house during the night. You and I can make a difference. .. ::http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2 496/3857225934_7c7f358636.jpg


By Lauben Tushemereirwe (15), Tue, 25 Aug 2009 13:45:10 PDT
Edited: Wed, 26 Aug 2009 01:06:38 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

Lauben Tushemereirwe said:

Thanks Ben for your contribution. It is good you have been here and you have witnessed all this happen up to the extent of retrieving place names in their correct spellings. I herewith bring on board one of the families improvising for shelter.Due to congestion in the house, the family has improvised. During the day, the mattress that was offered by a charity organisation is hanged up and during the night it is put down for children to sleep on. This is because there are no movements in the house during the night. You and I can make a difference.
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2496/3857225934_7c7f358636.jpg

Here is a structure that acts as a kitchen. When it rains, the children skip lunch or supper because this structure permits water to pass through and wet the floor making it impossible for fire lighting.


By David Bale (146), Tue, 25 Aug 2009 13:59:37 PDT
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Lauben Tushemereirwe said:

Alright, the WWC project is a very good initiative with a focused vision. It is indeed true that when the world is shared, then it will be closer and people will get to know the best practices, lessons learnt, challenges as well as new ways of carrying on development work bridging the widening gap between the developed and developing countries. Iam speaking from a rural perspective and i herewith attach a photograph of some of the children living in difficult conditions after loosing their parents to the Monster AIDS. There are very many other children in Rakai and Lyantonde districts of Uganda living on their own in very difficult conditons without parental love, care and guidance. I trust the wwc project has already provided a platform for us to share such information. Thank you all for making this possible.

Lauben, the partnerships to be announced on 1st January 2010 will cover every area in the world's richest and poorest countries. Lyantonde and Rakai have randomly been allocated parts of the city of Dallas in Texas in the USA.

We are only beginning to find out what will be the best ways of fostering links between partnered areas. I'd be delighted to help in any way I can.

I have just sent this email to the kind of organisation I would hope might take an interest in the problems you have in Uganda. Actually this is an organisation that is based in an area of Dallas that is adjacent to your partner area, but I wondered if they might be able to suggest people or organisations actually in your partner area.

This was the text of my email:

Dear Orphan Outreach,

As you are aware, there are AIDS orphans all over the world and I see you have currently chosen to work with those in India, Russia, Guatemala and Honduras. I realise therefore that you may not be able to assist me directly, but I am trying to establish supportive links between AIDS orphans in Lyantonde and Rakai districts in Central Uganda and northern areas in Dallas (City council districts 2, 13 & 14), Addison, Farmers Branch, Highland Park, Irving and University Park.

These are the parts of richest fifth and poorest fifth of the world's countries that have been paired at random by the WorldWide Connection Project for the period 2010-2019. During that period, partner areas in all parts of the world are being encouraged to develop links to further international awareness and understanding and help build a more loving and peaceful world.

Today I read what Lauben Tushemereirwe wrote about AIDS orphans in Lyantonde in Uganda at http://www.ned.com/group/wwc/new s/15/8/ and I am now hoping to put him in touch with people or organisations in his WWC partner area in Dallas who share a concern for child AIDS victims. Although I think Orphan Outreach is situated within Dallas City District 11 (partner area in Upper West region of Ghana), I hoped you might still be able to suggest people or organisations in City council districts 2,13 & 14, Addison, Farmers Branch, Highland Park, Irving and University Park whom Lauben might try to contact, since you are also based in North Dallas.

I know this is an unusual request, but any kind of help you might give that might lead to good links being established between these partner areas in the global north and global south would be hugely appreciated.

Kind regards

David Bale


By Ben Parkinson (72), Tue, 25 Aug 2009 14:31:55 PDT
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And Ben Parkinson said:

There are many better ways to spend $78k, though imho.

I think the counter argument here, if the project works on a larger scale, is that billions have been contributed in other aid programs and the overall situation has not improved. The beneficiaries are not becoming self sufficient which is the only long term solution.

Well the counter argument is correct, but two wrongs don't make a right. Aid is not the same as investment and I feel strongly that fear of competition is causing overseas funders to focus on non-sustainable projects, like AIDS awareness, vastly more than sustainable activity, i.e. social enterprise. Problem is, boredom, lack of work and industry actually creates an "environment" for the spread of AIDS.


By Lauben Tushemereirwe (15), Tue, 25 Aug 2009 23:13:18 PDT
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David~Please Support Sherry's CameraWish~Bale said:

Lauben Tushemereirwe said:

Alright, the WWC project is a very good initiative with a focused vision. It is indeed true that when the world is shared, then it will be closer and people will get to know the best practices, lessons learnt, challenges as well as new ways of carrying on development work bridging the widening gap between the developed and developing countries. Iam speaking from a rural perspective and i herewith attach a photograph of some of the children living in difficult conditions after loosing their parents to the Monster AIDS. There are very many other children in Rakai and Lyantonde districts of Uganda living on their own in very difficult conditons without parental love, care and guidance. I trust the wwc project has already provided a platform for us to share such information. Thank you all for making this possible.

Lauben, the partnerships to be announced on 1st January 2010 will cover every area in the world's richest and poorest countries. Lyantonde and Rakai have randomly been allocated parts of the city of Dallas in Texas in the USA.

We are only beginning to find out what will be the best ways of fostering links between partnered areas. I'd be delighted to help in any way I can.

I have just sent this email to the kind of organisation I would hope might take an interest in the problems you have in Uganda. Actually this is an organisation that is based in an area of Dallas that is adjacent to your partner area, but I wondered if they might be able to suggest people or organisations actually in your partner area.

This was the text of my email:

Dear Orphan Outreach,

As you are aware, there are AIDS orphans all over the world and I see you have currently chosen to work with those in India, Russia, Guatemala and Honduras. I realise therefore that you may not be able to assist me directly, but I am trying to establish supportive links between AIDS orphans in Lyantonde and Rakai districts in Central Uganda and northern areas in Dallas (City council districts 2, 13 & 14), Addison, Farmers Branch, Highland Park, Irving and University Park.

These are the parts of richest fifth and poorest fifth of the world's countries that have been paired at random by the WorldWide Connection Project for the period 2010-2019. During that period, partner areas in all parts of the world are being encouraged to develop links to further international awareness and understanding and help build a more loving and peaceful world.

Today I read what Lauben Tushemereirwe wrote about AIDS orphans in Lyantonde in Uganda at http://www.ned.com/group/wwc/new s/15/8/ and I am now hoping to put him in touch with people or organisations in his WWC partner area in Dallas who share a concern for child AIDS victims. Although I think Orphan Outreach is situated within Dallas City District 11 (partner area in Upper West region of Ghana), I hoped you might still be able to suggest people or organisations in City council districts 2,13 & 14, Addison, Farmers Branch, Highland Park, Irving and University Park whom Lauben might try to contact, since you are also based in North Dallas.

I know this is an unusual request, but any kind of help you might give that might lead to good links being established between these partner areas in the global north and global south would be hugely appreciated.

Kind regards

David Bale

Hello David, Thank you so much for this information. Iam happy to learn that Lyantonde and Rakai district in Uganda have randomly been allocated parts of the city of Dallas in Texas in the USA. I appreciate this allocation and dedicate my commitment towards a successful partnership.

Thank you for your contact with Orphan Outreach. I look forward to collaborating with everyone to develop links to further international awareness and understanding and help build a more loving and peaceful world.


By Nicholas Bentley (27), Wed, 26 Aug 2009 10:53:08 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

Ben Parkinson said:

Well the counter argument is correct, but two wrongs don't make a right. Aid is not the same as investment and I feel strongly that fear of competition is causing overseas funders to focus on non-sustainable projects, like AIDS awareness, vastly more than sustainable activity, i.e. social enterprise. Problem is, boredom, lack of work and industry actually creates an "environment" for the spread of AIDS.

Funny, when I saw the Basic Income Grants scheme I saw it as investment not aid although I suppose it is a combination of the two. I saw it as investing in each individual to see what they would make of it rather than aid, like a supply of food, which would just keep them going to the next day. Of course the scheme has not been going long enough or being tried on a large enough scale to test if BIG's are the right move.


By David Bale (146), Wed, 26 Aug 2009 12:06:15 PDT
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It's interesting to note how there has always been a debate about whether welfare benefits work better when they are means tested. On the one hand you can target the benefits more precisely on the those you intend to be benefit recipients, but at the same time you discourage some of that same group from applying. Universal benefits ensures much higher take-up, but appears to cost a lot more, even though much of this cost can usually be clawed back through taxation.

It seems to be a similar argument here with BIGs, with the point at issue not being whether they are means tested but motive tested. In other words, would basic income grants work better if targetted on those motivated to use their BIG as an investment rather than as aid?

If developed as a top-down model, universal entitlement to a BIG is a possibility. It would be really heartening if that resulted in the generation of countless entrepreneurs.

As a bottom-up model, I'm sure the cost of universal entitlement would be far too great for any one-to-one scheme (i.e. any scheme that matched equal numbers of donors and recipients) unless this is done in relation only to very small communities (e.g. village, school, faith group congregation). So that means some degree of selection.

Either the small community is chosen partly for its capacity for some good ROI or individuals within it are chosen for the same reason.

But to specify exactly how the BIG is to be used (as a condition of entitlement) seems to run contrary to the whole BIG philosophy. So, as I posted before, I think BIGs could work within a WWC partnership, provided they were targetted on those capable of and motivated towards making positive changes in their lives.


By Ben Parkinson (72), Wed, 26 Aug 2009 14:56:53 PDT
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I agree that a BIG should not be stipulated to need to be spent in a certain way, but I'd like to see it linked to new opportunities and I would suggest that this does not run contrary to the philosophy and might indeed immediately generate new employment, were the new items available for sale to be well chosen for the location.

I'd also like to see it linked somehow to "good practice expenditure", which means that recipients are given a chance to see how others have used their additional money positively and maybe even some successful ones would come and talk to new recipients.


By John Powers (139), Wed, 26 Aug 2009 17:21:58 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

I've been following with interest. Not directly on point but I've read a blog called Jack Saturday for a long time. Saturday is anti-wage slavery and provides a quote once a week--last week was 402. So there's quite an interesting mix of views in words and graphics.


By Ben Parkinson (72), Thu, 27 Aug 2009 00:44:18 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

There was an interesting economic experiment a while back, which seemed to be quite successful in the UK, where a local town started to issue its own currency, in an attempt to boost the local economy, raise the town's profile, but also to ensure money spent was only spent in the local town and thus did not leave the area.

I'm pretty sure Lewes have been on this idea for quite a long while, but here is a relatively recent link, with a video:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/progr ammes/working_lunch/7392286.stm

How this would work in practice in Africa would require a bit of thought, especially to counter the initial suspicion of new "local" money. However, it would ensure that the newly introduced money infused the local economy and not somewhere else. I also think it would be helpful to counter corruption, as these new notes would be easier to track.

Something also tells me that banknote collectors would love to get their hands on these rare African notes and would pay more than their face value in real money!


By Ben Parkinson (72), Thu, 27 Aug 2009 02:50:19 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

My apologies for monopolising the thread a bit:)

I was just browsing the web for Kisalo-Salo, to check I'd got the spelling right! It's actually a slum area in Kampala, where Phillip, one of the Butterflies lives. I plug it into Google and lo and behold it appears next to a Kiva loan. A woman there had paid back a loan of $900 for her small shop stock.

http://www.kiva.org/app.php?page =businesses&action=about& ;id=21856

Now would it not be an idea - which I'm sure Kiva have thought about - to offer a BIG to every recipient of a Kiva loan that has paid back their money? They have shown that they can be responsible, plan and forecast correctly. Somehow this feels better than giving the money to a drunk guy in the street I met while I was there, who kept on repeating the words "gimme one thousand, gimme one thousand".


By David Bale (146), Thu, 27 Aug 2009 03:25:46 PDT
Edited: Thu, 27 Aug 2009 06:56:26 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

I agree it not only feels better, but would be likely to work better.

However, the idea leaves me with a slightly uncomfortable feeling that the payment of a BIG, following repayment, might undermine some of the benefits of it having been a loan in the first place. Would the Kiva loan recipient budget quite so carefully if s/he were to think it doesn't really matter if I don't make (much of) a profit to repay the Kiva loan, as long as I can get a short term loan (at whatever interest!); I can then repay the second loan from my BIG.

An alternative approach might be to use the repayment of the loan as an indicator of someone deserving a measure of community trust. The system might then use those who repay their loans as nominators for others in their community (excluding perhaps family and friends) who might benefit from a temporary BIG as a first step towards getting a regular source of income established.

The BIG might then be seen more as an investment than aid and it might serve as a platform for making a credible pitch for requesting a Kiva loan once their fledgling business has started to grow.

Or perhaps that might just be a bit too complicated.

edited for typos, punctuation, sequence and to change "nominees" to "nominators" - other than that, the post was fine!


By John Powers (139), Thu, 27 Aug 2009 11:28:28 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

I'm not sure what's a good label for talking about motivations and money, perhaps economic psychology, or the preferred term behavioral economics. But there is surprisingly little study in this direction.

Something I find quite interesting is how people communicate and the sources of misunderstanding. Last night a friend linked to a FT article What the World's Poorest Can Teach Us About Money Management. One of the points in it is we think $1 a day and think it's really $1 everyday, but the reality is chunks of money and then no money. The article reminded me of Paul Polak and his 12 steps, the second one is: Talk to people and listen. In the video to illustrate this point he tells about how development economists were appalled by the spare use of fertilizer in Bangaldesh. When a farmer was asked why he answered: "That's easy every ten years or so there's a big flood. We only apply as much fertilizer that we can afford to loose in a ten year period."

Part of the miscommunication is a presumption on the part of moneyed people that poor people don't behave rationally. But the reasons for the behavior of poor people can make lots of sense from their perspective. There must be an attempt towards understanding.

Recently there's been much attention to results of randomized control trials (RCT) of microfinance. The results seem to suggest that microfinance doesn't work. Duncan Green is a development economist for Oxfam and wrote a book "From Poverty to Power." His recent insights about these studies are very smart. The bottom line is we still don't know very much, and we must study areas that get to the psychology of decision making, understanding that decisions are made in particular contexts. Assuming we know what the contexts are without trying to really know is what so often leads to economic folly.

The Edge Master Class actually A Short Course in Behavioral Economics demonstrates what it might look like to build economic systems of aid based on understanding rather than presumptions.

Local currencies, or alternative money, is a fascinating subject. Back at Onet there were some really high-level discussions about it. One big generalization--probably foolish--I come away with from such discussions is: Nobody really knows what money is. open money is a project some of our old friends are moving on with. I very much like their construct that open money is "a wealth-acknowledgment information system." It seems to me that a big part of moving from poverty to power is to acknowledge wealth. Poor people often have much better understanding of wealth than those of us with money do. I feel sure that alternative currencies can be a way to help people all over get a truer picture of wealth and poverty.


By Christoff Oosthuysen (3), Wed, 02 Sep 2009 00:28:39 PDT
Comment feedback score: 2 (* *) +|-

Would be most interest if similar scale of injection to similar size communities would be done say as micro loans for small business activity in one village, support of just one entrepreneur in another, running feeding schemes in yet another, etc. And then to compare the impact as well as the opinions of the people from the villages...

Nicholas Bentley said:

Basic Income Grants are an interesting idea and I wondered if when a rich WWC area was partnered with a really poor community BIG's could be an effective way to make a difference.

The idea that is being tested in this small Namibian village is simple: All the residents are paid a basic monthly income of 100 Namibia dollars, or about €9 ($13). There are no conditions, and nothing is expected in return. Giving these citizens enough money to feed themselves and send children to school empowers them with a sense of responsibility and many businesses and projects are springing up as a result of this initial stimulus.

What do you think?


By Nicholas Bentley (27), Wed, 02 Sep 2009 12:32:49 PDT
Comment feedback score: 0 +|-

Christoff Oosthuysen said:

Would be most interest if similar scale of injection to similar size communities would be done say as micro loans for small business activity in one village, support of just one entrepreneur in another, running feeding schemes in yet another, etc. And then to compare the impact as well as the opinions of the people from the villages...

I totally agree, to see comparisons between these different types of funding would be interesting and instructive. An opening for a research initiative here!


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